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astronomy-to-zoology:

Spider-tailed Horned Viper (Pseudocerastes urarachnoides)

…a species of Persian horned viper collected in western Iran in 2006. Like its common name suggests this unique viper has an odd wind scorpion shaped growth at the tip of its tail. Originally it was thought to be a Persian Horned Viper (Pseudocerastes persicus) with a odd tumor, but it was later reveled that a whole population had these growths and they were named a new species. 

The growth is actually used as a lure and experiments have shown that birds who peck at it were lead to the vipers head and eaten. So far it has only been observed preying on birds but it is though to prey on other predators of wind scorpions as well.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Squamata-Serpentes-Viperidae-Viperinae-Pseudocerastes-P.urarachnoides

Images: Omid Mozaffari and Fathina et al.

(via pricklylegs)

genesisfrompluto:

Black Box 101 - Pilot:

I was expecting to enjoy this one, but I did even more than I was expecting! The storyline was well assembled and the characters were interesting. There was also good character development, but not overly enough to stop me wanting to see where else the engagement goes. There were some slightly confusing moments at times, such as when Lydia Regan appeared and I was trying to work out who was involved with whom and who was the parent of whom, but hopefully these things can be ironed out within the next few episodes. One thing I’m slightly curious about is whether real life bipolar people think that the pilot was realistic?

Description rating: 7

Pilot rating: 8

boonorbane:

 True.

Dr. Seuss <3

(Source: foxxypants, via laughbitches)

lolzpicx:

Just Funny Pics click here for more
humoristics:

iwillmakeyourofl:

Should I call Animal Protection?

ლ(ಠ益ಠლ) why no clicky?

humoristics:

iwillmakeyourofl:

Should I call Animal Protection?

ლ(ಠ益ಠლ) why no clicky?

odditiesoflife:

Curious History:  The Evolution of “Wound Man”

“Wound Man” is an illustration which first appeared in European surgical texts in the Middle Ages. It laid out schematically the various wounds a person might suffer in battle or in accidents.

Late medieval anatomy works often contain a standard set of illustrations, copied and recopied from text to text. Typically, these depict the body front and back; the skeleton and muscles within it each from the same two viewpoints, and so on. Strangest to our modern eyes is the illustration that usually comes last: the Wound Man, a compendium of all the injuries that a body might sustain. Captions beside the stoic figure describe the injuries and sometimes give prognoses: often precise distinctions are drawn between types of injuries, such as whether an arrow has embedded itself in a muscle or shot right through.

(via pricklylegs)

xombiedirge:

Reservoir Dogs bTyler Stout

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(Source: ForGIFs.com, via laughcentre)

(Source: togifs, via pricklylegs)